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Logic Problem fans, discuss solutions and get solving help.
6/15/2011 10:53:07 PM


Guest
Been getting pretty serious into my logic problems variety pack, and they really are SO much fun! Thing is, there are some that give these alternate universes, and without a little tinkering and thinkering and blink-blink-blinkering, I would eventually have to make these crude little copies of the puzzle for myself in order to map out thought processes and what-ifs. It was, frankly, not the best way to interpret the problems as I often would stare blankly at them in a bit of disgust of my handiwork alone, heheh. So, a sidled on down to the Walgreen's the other day, and picked up some graph paper. Now, if you haven't made this sort of a small purchase to help you along the way, I recommend it, highly. I'll give you a 'for instance'...

Today, I got one of those mental blocks on a particular puzzle. It was dealing with dates, and cities, and (heheheh) a form of illegal entry into a bank. A late 2008 British Edition which must have been close to Christmas, because it dealt with holiday break-ins, heheh. I enjoy these because of their relative simplicity, and, doing these things are work, I can get distracted and come back with little loss in concentration, and the puzzles dealing with pictures are cute and entertaining. But this one was stumping me. I got to a certain point, and went over and over the clues, to find something I missed, and my brain just wasn't getting it. So, I busted out my graph paper and went through the steps again, and eliminated the conflicts and in re-doing the puzzle from scratch, I found the catch I was missing, embarassingly so, heh. After the revelation, I whizzed through it and checked my work and was bang on.

The hook I was missing? Well, in dealing with dates and such, sometimes I blank on a clue telling me the obvious. In this case, they were asking for sequential years as in 'Through the wall came the year after the Paris break-in'. There was only one possible back-to-back year situation after all the others played out, so then, the dominoes fell neatly in succession. It took going back and starting the puzzle afresh to see it, and the tool that allowed me to do that expeditiously was the trusty graph paper. Frustration abated, smile played across lips, and satisfaction at FINALLY seeing it and getting it right! Do you sometimes pump a fist, or perhaps hold your arms wide and ask the empty room, "Who da man?!?!?" Small times like that, I do, unabashedly, heheh. Can't wait to use it on some of the harder ones in Original, and perhaps the list problems to see if it helps. Also, the cute little puzzles in British Edition so instead of scrawling teeny little examples and using the minimal space given in the book itself, I have a little elbow room. Could have used it in the problem about floors and gifts and buyers and salespeople.

Graph paper? <pumps fist> Good buy.

Good bye, for now.

TDHO
edited by TheDarkHorseOne on 6/15/2011
<em>edited by TheDarkHorseOne on 6/15/2011</em>

6/24/2011 10:01:26 PM

Noeckett
Noeckett
Posts: 48
I use graph paper to solve Diagramless crosswords. I don't like to use any hints, so I have to solve the puzzle down to the halfway point before I can determine how it fits in on the provided grid, so the graph paper is nice to start on since it doesn't have those boundaries.

8/13/2011 11:26:15 PM


Guest
Noeckett wrote:
I use graph paper to solve Diagramless crosswords. I don't like to use any hints, so I have to solve the puzzle down to the halfway point before I can determine how it fits in on the provided grid, so the graph paper is nice to start on since it doesn't have those boundaries.


Pretty nice tip, Noekett (with apologies for taking so long to respond). I'm going to have to use that as well. I like diagramless, but I use the cheater starter for the ones that don't have it. Will be fun to use the graph instead and start getting them without the cheat.

Another use I've found is in the logic puzzles for pictured ones, like finding a first name, last name, and occupation for a line-up, or figuring out where someone is placed in a building puzzle. The visual, for me, is a help.

Then there's plotting out my dream garden, or house, etc. Yeah, I'm middle aged, but still have those fanciful dreams of youth. If only time and money allowed that fulfillment, heheh. Work too much for a garden, and don't get paid enough to have my dream home, off the grid, with a garden, chicken coop, pig sty, small cow barn for milk and cheese and occasional steak, and a huge plot of land for wheat, hops, and barley to create my own brew!

I'll keep playing the lottery, heheh. AND, doing my puzzles, and dreaming my little dreams.

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