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Home » Logic Problem Exchange » Aug. 2011 Logic Problems #8, page 12

Logic Problem fans, discuss solutions and get solving help.
6/24/2011 1:31:01 AM

ding_dong_daddy
ding_dong_daddy
Posts: 4
Hint #1: "Pages 30 and 60 lead to being frightened by a tiny
mouse (which occurs when you open the chest) and being
enveloped by a strange fog, in some order."

Does that mean when you open the chest you have to go to page 30 OR 60? Does it mean that both 30 and 60 have the same consequence (mouse and fog?)

According to the solution, page 30 has only one result and page 60 has only one result. That seems to contradict clue #1.

It's OK to write complicated clues, but I don't like clues whose meaning is not even clear.

Here is what I think the author really meant: ""Page 30 leads to EITHER being frightened by a tiny mouse (which occurs when you open the chest) OR being enveloped by a strange fog. Page 60 also leads to either being frightened by a tiny mouse or being enveloped by a strange fog.

6/24/2011 9:09:30 AM

LogicEditor
LogicEditor
Posts: 70
Thanks for your inquiry. The introduction to this puzzle states: "For each choice, you must turn to a different page in order to read the consequence (no two of which are the same)." Thus, each page leads to a single, unique consequence.

Clue 1 reads: "Pages 30 and 60 lead to being frightened by a tiny mouse (which occurs when you open the chest) and being enveloped by a strange fog, in some order." (emphasis added). Since each page leads to a unique consequence, this means that one of these pages leads to being frightened by a mouse, and the other page leads to being enveloped by a fog.

6/25/2011 1:46:57 AM

ding_dong_daddy
ding_dong_daddy
Posts: 4
Your explanation is a lot better than the clue. I have noticed that other clues in these books are written in that same strange formula, using the word AND when it should be either/or.

12/4/2011 4:12:48 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1014
That business about "in some order" always means "A and/or B result in C and/or D," to me. It always means to me that "A results in C, or A results in D.
B results in whatever of the 2 results isn't A's result." It also implies "No other choice results in either C or D." I never thought about the words "and"
and "or" in these "... in some order" clues, but essentially it narrows 2 things down to 2 things, if you know what I mean (well, sometimes it narrows 3
things down to 3 things).

If the clue didn't use the phrase "in some order," you might think it meant "respectively," meaning "in the exact order we just gave." So if a clue said,
for example, "John and Mary are surnamed Smith and Jones" without the "in some order" phrase, I'd think it meant "John and Mary are Smith and
Jones respectively" meaning John is Smith and Mary is Jones. The "in some order" phrase means John might be Smith but isn't necessarily Smith; he
could be Jones, in which case Mary is Smith.

--
Amy

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