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3/24/2017 7:56:33 PM
Topic:
Multiplication puzzle

Frances
Frances
Posts: 643
A math problem was posted on PennyDellPuzzles Facebook page last week. Has anyone else worked on or solved it? Maybe some of you who like math and a challenge might have a go at it. I also put it on Flickr here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/149284839@N08/32787840784

Let me know if you solve it, would like a hint, or want the answer.

3/24/2017 5:22:54 PM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
Mon 3-20: Dell, Jigsaw Sudoku; PP, Zigzag Wordseek
Tue 3-21: Dell, Anacrostic; PP, Crypto-Families
Wed 3-22: Dell, Cross Sums; PP, Diagramless
Thu 3-23: Dell, Figgerit; PP, Wizard Words
Fri 3-24: Dell, Figure Logic; PP, Flower Power

3/19/2017 5:41:55 PM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
Wed 3/15: Dell, In the Balance; PP, Cryptograms
Thu 3/16: Dell, Cross Code; PP, Crostic
Fri 3/17: Dell, Logic; PP, Anagram Magic Square
Sat 3/18: Dell, State Dinner; PP, Brick By Brick
Sun 3/19: Dell, Solicross; PP, Framework

3/17/2017 10:16:15 AM
Topic:
Just wanted to share my opinion

admin
admin
Administrator
Posts: 105
Thanks, Apollo Luke! The editors will be thrilled to hear this!

Best,
Admin

3/16/2017 9:39:04 PM
Topic:
Math & Logic 3/17, Sum Logic #1

Josh
Josh
Posts: 155
gauthier wrote:
Hi, I haven't seen the problem myself (my M&L subscription lapsed), but the rules of Sum Logic require that the diagonals also add to the target number and that no number is repeated in a row, column, or diagonal. Did you check both ways to see if one of them could be ruled out for this reason?


In all my years of solving it I never noticed diagonal in the directions, and I think this might be the only time where that was required to solve that I can recall. Good catch gauthier - that would indeed create a unique solution. I guess that goes to show that as long as one might be a solver, there's sometimes directions that can be missed after all that time!

3/15/2017 9:47:01 PM
Topic:
OT: Amy's cancer update of 3/15/17

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
It’s been a while since my last update. Since then I’ve had ups and downs with health, chiefly being out of breath since around mid-February. They’ve done a million tests (I’m getting sick of tests already but I’m scheduled for another on Friday 3/17) and seem to find nothing wrong with my heart, most of them (a bunch of doctors and nurse-practitioners) thinking I’m out of shape. When I saw my oncologist on Monday 2/27/17 and complained about being out of breath, she said we’d stop chemo for 3 weeks while I go through all these tests.

My compression pump finally came 3 weeks after St. Mary left me in the lurch without one and without letting me go to their facility and use theirs. I can read, do puzzles, and/or sleep while the pump is on (which I do 3-4 times a week for an hour). The one-hour timer on it means you can’t accidentally pump for too long even if you fall asleep. It keeps my legs nice and skinny for a while, and pumps the excess fluid up to a point where I can excrete it out. I stopped taking the pills for that when I got the pump.

A weird thing happened the other morning: I took the “gripper-slipper” sock off my right foot and then realized I could not find my right “bootie” that I wear at night (and could swear I had been wearing right up to that point). So I got on line and ordered another one for the right foot. Luckily, you can order just one and are not forced to order a pair. Let’s hope the new one comes soon. How the night-time socks will stay on, without a “bootie,” who knows? (Last night I “solved” the problem by keeping my daytime socks on for 36 hours, not a recommended practice.)

So between the cancer, chemotherapy, lymphedema, and Shortness Of Breath (which the doctors abbreviate as SOB, which of course I find amusing), the old adage of “never a dull moment” rings true for me.

Some of you may remember that in my last missive, I quoted Betty MacDonald’s “Onions in the Stew.” I got a cheap paperback version of that book after one of my friends suggested I read it. The author reminds me a little of Erma Bombeck. I liked the whole book (although onions, and stew, were never specifically mentioned in the book, only in the title). Additionally, I was inspired, and will order more of her books, when I saw the blurb on the last page of the book (by, I think, the publisher, George Mann Books, in England). It says “Betty MacDonald’s first three runaway bestsellers recorded her paradoxically hilarious progress through a disastrous first marriage on a remote chicken farm in the Olympic Mountains, followed by the terror of the White Plague and the miseries of mass unemployment during the Great American Depression. Onions in the Stew … is the story of those good times which came later when, happily married again and living with her husband and much loved daughters on the beautiful island of Vashon, opposite Seattle in Puget Sound, international fame as a writer finally knocked at her door. In 1958 cancer suddenly caught up with her and killed her but, as her lifelong friend Blanche Caffiere recalls she was joking right up to the end. She was 49 years old.” The earlier books are listed as The Egg and I, Anybody Can Do Anything, and The Plague and I.


Meanwhile, I will sign off, as usual, with the humorous and/or inspiring quotes I always find.

First is Anacrostic #4 from “Dell Crossword Special” of January 2014. “With American creativeness in the matter of coining first names, one family labeled its fourteenth child ‘Finis.’ Difficulty arose when a fifteenth child came along, but it was solved with ‘Postscript.’ “

Second is an Anagram Magic Square from the website, on 2/21/17: “Life has both roses and thorns.”

Third is a Word Games Puzzle from the website, on 2/15/17: “The farmer explained, ‘Raising tobacco caused an uproar amongst my folks, so I switched to sugar. Now I’m just raising cane.’ “

The last 3 are “Figgerits” #14, 15 and 16 from “Dell Official Variety Puzzles,” August 2015.
#14: “Those who are healthy and satisfied are rich.”
#15: “One can’t be a good liar without a good memory.”
#16: “Thoughts are mightier than great armies.”


As usual, thanks to Elizabeth Palmer for having sent me 40 of her old puzzle books last July. I still have a few of them to get started on, and I still have some "goodies" I want to quote from some of the others she sent me.

Sincerely,



Amy Lowenstein
edited by Amy-in-PA on 3/15/2017

3/15/2017 9:41:35 PM
Topic:
Math & Logic 3/17, Sum Logic #1

gauthier
gauthier
Posts: 9
Hi, I haven't seen the problem myself (my M&L subscription lapsed), but the rules of Sum Logic require that the diagonals also add to the target number and that no number is repeated in a row, column, or diagonal. Did you check both ways to see if one of them could be ruled out for this reason?

3/14/2017 1:56:08 PM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
Saturday 3/11/17: Dell, Bingo Plays; PP, Word Games
Sunday 3/12/17: Dell, Petal Puzzle; PP, Word Seek Missing List
Monday 3/13: Dell, Cryptogram; PP, Fill-In
Tues 3/14: Dell, Samurai Sudoku; PP, Word Seek / Patchwords

3/11/2017 8:50:31 PM
Topic:
Just wanted to share my opinion

Apollo Luke
Apollo Luke
Posts: 1
Dear Penny Press:


I just want to take this moment to tell you how awesome the April 2017 issue of Classic Variety + Crosswords is.


It isn't a title I buy on a regular basis, but I'm really glad I bought this one. These are some of the best and most entertaining crosswords I've seen in a Penny Press magazine. My favorite is "Cheesy Movies" on pg. 178. I loved the theme answers and the surprise Macy Gray reference at 106-Down (probably had that song stuck in my head for about an hour after. Oh the nostalgia!) Plus there's a cryptic crossword, an At 6's and 7's, AND a Battleships-- my three absolute favorite crossword varieties.


Whatever you're doing, Penny Press, keep it up! I can't wait to see the next issue of Classic.

3/10/2017 1:12:41 AM
Topic:
Difficulty making avatar

StacyHarris
StacyHarris
Posts: 1
Persanyu this site is great

3/5/2017 7:55:20 AM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
Sunday 3/5/17: Dell, Quotation Puzzle; PP, Double Trouble
Monday 3/6: Dell, Cross Sums; PP, Syllacrostic
Tuesday 3/7: Dell, Changelings; PP, The Shadow
Wed. 3/8: Dell Quotegram; PP, Logic
Thu. 3/9: Dell, Cryptoquiz; PP, Letterboxes

Friday 3/10: Dell, Spellathon; PP, Match-Up
....By the way, there's a chance I may start doing these updates once a week rather than once a day
edited by Amy-in-PA on 3/10/2017

3/2/2017 8:26:34 PM
Topic:
Negative puzzles

myq8472
myq8472
Posts: 6
Thanks Amy and Semipro. you've given me a lot to think over.

3/2/2017 4:38:23 PM
Topic:
Negative puzzles

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
myq8472 wrote:
Thanks for your response Amy, but what I am referring to, is that I started a puzzle this month. After put in the clues, there wasn't one positive answer to work off of. They were all negative. The puzzle by the way was #19 from the April edition.
The puzzle is Let's Do Brunch, where you have to determine each student's omelet, meat, fruit and drink.
1) says Neither the student who ate blueberries (who didn't drink soda) nor the one who had a side of bacon is the student who ordered a Greek omelet. Blake (who isn't the student who ordered Corned Beef Hash) didn't order strawberries.

the clues go on in this way, with no positive clue given to work off of. When I was done with all the clues, my chart was all negatives. I just didn't know how to begin to solve this puzzle.
edited by myq8472 on 3/2/2017


I no longer have a subscription to logic magazines, so I haven't seen this particular puzzle. But in general, if I see that "neither" the one who ate blueberries nor the one who had bacon, had a Greek omelet, then I know a few negatives (and the more "negatives" I know, the better, because at some point all that may be left is an "elimination" answer), namely that the blueberries and the bacon don't go together, that the blueberries and Greek omelet don't go together, and that the bacon and Greek omelet don't go together. Those "neither" clues give you about 3 different "negatives" at once. In this case, the parentheses add one more negative, namely that the soda doesn't go with the blueberries.


When your chart is a bunch of negatives, you may have a couple of choices left for positives, which is better than at the beginning when there are lots of choices for positives.

3/2/2017 4:35:07 PM
Topic:
Negative puzzles

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 250
myq8472 wrote:
1) says Neither the student who ate blueberries (who didn't drink soda) nor the one who had a side of bacon is the student who ordered a Greek omelet. Blake (who isn't the student who ordered Corned Beef Hash) didn't order strawberries.

Okay, so your chart is full of symbols that mean negations such as "blueberries NOT soda" and "blueberries NOT bacon" and "blueberries NOT Greek" and "bacon NOT Greek." At this stage, I would look for something that's mentioned many times. From Clue 1, it might be blueberries, as blueberries are (negatively) linked to three things. But a clue I haven't seen may be a better place to start. Then go through the clues and the chart in a way consistent with Amy's example about John's hair color. See what inferences you can make by combining information from different clues. Sure enough, this kind of cluing makes a puzzle harder than one that says outright that Mary ate grapefruit.

3/2/2017 1:22:54 PM
Topic:
Negative puzzles

myq8472
myq8472
Posts: 6
Thanks for your response Amy, but what I am referring to, is that I started a puzzle this month. After put in the clues, there wasn't one positive answer to work off of. They were all negative. The puzzle by the way was #19 from the April edition.
The puzzle is Let's Do Brunch, where you have to determine each student's omelet, meat, fruit and drink.
1) says Neither the student who ate blueberries (who didn't drink soda) nor the one who had a side of bacon is the student who ordered a Greek omelet. Blake (who isn't the student who ordered Corned Beef Hash) didn't order strawberries.

the clues go on in this way, with no positive clue given to work off of. When I was done with all the clues, my chart was all negatives. I just didn't know how to begin to solve this puzzle.
edited by myq8472 on 3/2/2017

3/2/2017 10:13:34 AM
Topic:
Negative puzzles

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
I know what you mean. I think you mean there are all "negative clues," such as "John does not have blond hair." Sometimes, eventually, you get enough negative clues on the same item (such as "John" in my example) that there's only one thing left, so by elimination, that's the answer.

Other times, you wind up with, say, that John can't be blond or black hair, and the person who gets the Times newspaper can't be red, gray or white hair (leaving only blond or black as Times's possibilities) so that implies that John doesn't get the Times.

I hope this helps a little bit.

If you can quote the whole puzzle, including the introduction (because one in a while I ignore the introduction, to my peril!) maybe I can see if I wind up with SOMETHING positive.

3/1/2017 3:17:53 PM
Topic:
Negative puzzles

myq8472
myq8472
Posts: 6
I need help with Logic Problems. The last magazine I had, had me so frustrated. All of the clues just had negative answers. There was not one positive answer. How do you work with a puzzle like that? There must be a way. I was wondering if anyone had any advice when it came to these types of puzzles. Thanks.

2/28/2017 4:01:41 PM
Topic:
Questions

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
In general, my way of solving Codewords is to look for the QU. I can eliminate the last letter of a word as being the Q, and I can similarly eliminate the next-to-last letter of a word. Sometimes I'll see that, for example, there's a "1,3" combination in one place and a "1,16" combination elsewhere, so I know that 1 can't be the Q.

Eventually I get to the point where I only have 2 or 3 choices for what might be the Q. If my choices boil down to, say, "6,2" and "8,18" then I'll count the number of 2's that I see, and the number of 18's, and if there are a lot of 18's, but very few 2's, then probably the 2 is the U, so the 6 would be the Q.

There are very few words in English that have a doubled u in them. So if I see that, for example, the 18 is doubled somewhere in the puzzle, I'll figure the 18 probably is not the U, so the 8 can't be the Q -- and so on.

Once I have the QU, then I know that whatever comes after that combination, must be some other vowel, so it's limited to 5 choices.

Hope this helps.

2/28/2017 12:38:09 PM
Topic:
Questions

Penny5
Penny5
Posts: 1
Any suggestions on how to solve the codeword puzzles in the family favorites crossword puzzle?

2/27/2017 8:59:23 PM
Topic:
Dell Math & Logic March 2017 p.27 Horrible clue

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1554
Greg wrote:
Spoiler Alert

Clue #5 reads "Bonnie (who didn't bake the chocolate cake) earned half as many points as the person who baked the vanilla cake, who earned more points than Glover."

In the solution, Bonnie *is* Glover and Glover is Bonnie. She is Bonnie Glover. I think that is a horrible clue. A clue bad enough to make me log in and post about it. If a single one sentence clue says that the vanilla cake is double one thing and more than another thing, that means to me TWO things, not the same one. If they'd seperated the information into a different clue, then I could see categorizing Glover as less, and Bonnie as half without being misleading.

If it is going to include the same person twice in the same sentence/clue, then it should have said "...vanilla cake, who earned DOUBLE the points that Glover earned" if it is going to say "Bonnie earned HALF...". Otherwise, the logic dictates to me that they are not the same person. Yes, "double" is "more", but I think in this case, because of the way it is seperated and worded all in the same clue/sentence, it means that "more" is not "double" and Glover is not Bonnie.

This made the puzzle unsolvable. I tried for a very long time to resolve the contradictions until I was forced to look up the solution. Very disappointed.

Greg


Yes, it sounds like a misleading clue to me. But over the years, I've learned not to take inferences just because one clue says "double" and also says "more," if you know what I mean.

I hope the other puzzles in this volume are up to snuff!

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