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8/22/2017 9:11:07 PM
Topic:
Logic Problem 4, VP&G, Nov 2010

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
Can you type up the intro and clues for those of us who don't have the old magazine handy? Sometimes, we on the forum are quicker to answer people than the editors.

8/22/2017 7:59:26 PM
Topic:
Logic Problem 4, VP&G, Nov 2010

rabidchihuahua
rabidchihuahua
Posts: 3
LETHAL LITERATURE: I can get to the point where I can narrow down the book published in 1999 to either Make an Offer or Seconds. I couldn't get past this point, so I looked at your solution. You eliminated Make an Offer based on clue 5 (day after Heidi Winters), but this refers to the day the book was purchased, not the year it was published. What am I missing?

Also, you use the terms "written" and "published" in the clues. I am assuming you are using both terms to mean year it was written/published, since that what we are solving for.

8/18/2017 1:29:06 PM
Topic:
Possible mistake in Dinosaur Decorations

Frances
Frances
Posts: 660
kward1906 wrote:
I see my mistake. I'm very embarrassed.


It's okay, kward1906. Mistakes are part of solving and happen to all of us solvers. Me, a lot. That's why I'll never be able to solve puzzles with a pen. smile Welcome to the forum!

8/18/2017 1:07:54 PM
Topic:
Possible mistake in Dinosaur Decorations

kward1906
kward1906
Posts: 2
I see my mistake. I'm very embarrassed.

8/18/2017 11:29:57 AM
Topic:
Possible mistake in Dinosaur Decorations

kward1906
kward1906
Posts: 2
The possible error is in Dinosaur Decorations, appearing in the October 2017 issue of Logic Problems.

Clue 4 says the position number of the allosaurus is one higher than that of the drawing of the brachiosaurus. I, like the solution, have the allosaurus in position 6. I, however, have the brachiosaurus in position 7, whereas the book has it in position 5. Isn't the number 6 one higher than 7? And if they are talking about the actual position in the picture, which I don't think it is, then 6 is in the lowest position on the refrigerator and not one higher than anything. If I am correct the puzzle is unsolvable as there is no way to distinguish between the positions of the tyrannosaurus and the diplodocus.

8/17/2017 6:33:09 AM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
In all cases, Dell listed first, PP next
Wed 8/9: Cross Sums; Brick by Brick
Thu 8/10: Quotation Puzzle; Framework
Fri 8/11: Laddergrams; Word Seek Zigzag
Sat 8/12: Extreme Sudoku; Crypto-Families
Sun 8/13: Triangular Square; Diagramless
Mon 8/14: Dear Hattie; Wizard Words (Spelunking)
Tue 8/15: The Path Not Taken (maze); Flower Power
Wed 8/16: Kriss Kross; Codeword
Thu 8/17: Cryptograms; Places, Please

8/10/2017 11:15:59 AM
Topic:
Logic Problems October 2017 - The China Syndrome

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
I did this puzzle recently, and until I paid attention to Clue 3, I put the Lenox into position F. So I think Clue 3 IS necessary!

8/9/2017 8:12:05 PM
Topic:
Spotlight Remember When Word Seek April 15, 2017

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 225
The first Cross Pairs puzzle on page 41 of this issue contains spaces in the word list for 20 pairs of words, but there are only 19 included in the puzzle diagram. The word list in the back of the book also contains only 19 pairs.

The fourth pairing listed is missing. The initial letters were given as B and U.

Bernadette

ETA: I just wanted to add that I'm only posting about this and other errors in order to alert other puzzlers. The editors at PD rarely, if ever, respond to these error messages. If anyone else encounters the same problems, they can check these threads to see they're not alone. smile
edited by Bernadette1959 on 8/10/2017

8/8/2017 11:26:38 AM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
In all cases, Dell listed first, PP next
Tue 8/1: Square Search; Match-Up
Wed 8/2: In the Balance; Word Games
Thu 8/3: CryptoQuiz; Word Seek Missing List
Fri 8/4: Word Charade; Fill-In
Sat 8/5: Figgerit; Word Seek Patchwords
Sun 8/6: Fill-In; Cryptograms
Mon 8/7: In the Abstract; Crostic
Tue 8/8: Cross-Ups; Anagram Magic Square

8/5/2017 2:33:44 PM
Topic:
Commonwealth Days

rabidchihuahua
rabidchihuahua
Posts: 3
Thank you Logic Editor!! The Neither/Nor gets me every time!

8/3/2017 10:33:40 AM
Topic:
Commonwealth Days

LogicEditor
LogicEditor
Posts: 84
rabidchihuahua wrote:
I have England's Best Logic Problems, Summer 2005, and I am stumped on 89. Commonwealth Days. I have read the answer in the back and am still stumped.

Clue 5 states: Jim Ward is neither the computer programmer nor the man who adopts the role of a Roundhead trooper and also the name of either Jasper Purvis or Giles Tibbetts.

I interpret this to mean that Jim Ward is not the programmer and doesn't adopt the role of trooper. The Roundhead trooper is either Jasper Purvis or Giles Tibbetts. According to your answer, "Jasper isn't the Roundhead trooper (clue 5),..." but this contradicts Clue 5. I can narrow Jasper down to either trooper or preacher, but can't go any further. Am I missing something?


We took another look at this puzzle. As you say, clue 5 reads "Jim Ward is neither the computer programmer nor the man who adopts the role of a Roundhead trooper." This means that Jim Ward isn't the computer programmer, that Jim Ward isn't the man who adopts the role of a Roundhead trooper, and that the computer programmer isn't the man who adopts the role of a Roundhead trooper (please see the note on page 18 of this issue for clarification on our use of the neither/nor construction).
Now, since by this point in the solution, we have determined that the computer programmer adopted the name Jasper Purvis, we can conclude from clue 5 that he did not adopt the role of the Roundhead trooper.
I hope this explanation has been helpful.

8/2/2017 5:09:14 PM
Topic:
Commonwealth Days

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 263
"Jasper isn't the Roundhead trooper" (from the solution) doesn't contradict Clue 5, because Giles might be the Roundhead trooper. But "Jasper isn't . . . trooper" doesn't follow from Clue 5, either. By Clue 5, Jasper might be the trooper.

Like Amy, I don't have a copy of this puzzle to help look for what may be wrong or misleading.

8/2/2017 12:22:57 PM
Topic:
Commonwealth Days

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
I don't have any magazines at my house going back that far. Would you be able to type the intro and clues so we can see what the whole puzzle is, and see if we come to your conclusion or something else?

8/1/2017 9:41:12 PM
Topic:
Commonwealth Days

rabidchihuahua
rabidchihuahua
Posts: 3
I have England's Best Logic Problems, Summer 2005, and I am stumped on 89. Commonwealth Days. I have read the answer in the back and am still stumped.

Clue 5 states: Jim Ward is neither the computer programmer nor the man who adopts the role of a Roundhead trooper and also the name of either Jasper Purvis or Giles Tibbetts.

I interpret this to mean that Jim Ward is not the programmer and doesn't adopt the role of trooper. The Roundhead trooper is either Jasper Purvis or Giles Tibbetts. According to your answer, "Jasper isn't the Roundhead trooper (clue 5),..." but this contradicts Clue 5. I can narrow Jasper down to either trooper or preacher, but can't go any further. Am I missing something?

8/1/2017 11:08:28 AM
Topic:
Dell Suiting Words on website 12/17/16

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 225
Hi Amy,

I guess I've always viewed puzzles/ games like Suiting Words and Masterworks, etc. as ones where part of the fun is in trying to beat the score achieved by the Editors. Don't you suppose these omissions of certain possible words are intentional? If the Editor's score could never be surpassed, I think it would deter solvers from even trying. So while they always present a very good score, they don't wish to make it impossible for solvers to outdo them from time to time.

I may be wrong, but this has always been my impression of puzzles/games like these! smile

Bernadette

7/31/2017 2:01:03 PM
Topic:
Free Puzzles of the Day XI

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
In all cases, Dell listed first, PP next
Fri 7/21: CrossCode; Wizard Words
Sat 7/22: Tanglewords; Flower Power
Sun 7/23: Bingo Plays; Places, Please
Mon 7/24: Picture Maze; Codeword
Tue 7/25: Logic; Quotefalls
Wed 7/26: Anglesearch; Missing Vowels
Thu 7/27: Changelings; Double Trouble
Fri 7/28: Jigsaw Sudoku; Syllacrostic
Sat 7/29: Find the Sentence; The Shadow
Sun 7/30: Circle Back; Logic
Mon 7/31: Anacrostic; Letter Boxes

7/31/2017 1:54:27 PM
Topic:
Dell Suiting Words on website 12/17/16

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1594
On the website on 7/17/17, there was a "Suiting Words" which listed as a word beginning with M, "Malice" which is worth only 34 points. I found "myelin" (and it's in the dictionary, not foreign, not slang, etc) which is worth 37 points. I think the editors could have gotten 3 more points in their total.

7/29/2017 11:54:45 PM
Topic:
Trigons Super challenger?

Josh
Josh
Posts: 158
wa4lrm wrote:
The Dell Math & Logic Problems July 2017 issue is the worst Trigons puzzle I ever came across. I only got started with 0 and 18 and the 0 has three 7's are the only ones I could started. The three 7's only can eliminate zeros on 7 column. Rest of this puzzle I had spent one hour with multiples of assumptions. This leaves no choice except multiple of guessing. I think Lester Jordan design this one as super challenger. Has anyone solve this without cheating or guess any one correctly?



Hi there! I was able to solve this without a ton of difficulty, but it does have less obvious helps than normal. Here's one example of a less obvious one that I worked through to get a breakthrough:

There's a 3 on the left side of the grid near the middle angle that's surrounded by a 12, 12 and 13. You know the 13 can't have a 0, and you know both 12's can't have a 0, so 0,0,3 is out. You also can't have two 12's with a 1, so 1, 1, 1 is out. So you know that 3 has to be the 0,1,2 3.

The 9 surrounded by the 14, 15 and 15, can be determined exactly, and can help narrow down where the 14s go, etc.

Hope this helps!

Josh

7/29/2017 8:17:28 PM
Topic:
Original Logic Problems August 2017

braggin
braggin
Posts: 4
Semipro, I am very sympathetic to the point you make about the context being important. But I was able to complete the entire puzzle, getting exactly the same result as the solution in the back of the magazine issue, armed with the correct information about all three lectures having the same theme on each day and that each day's theme is different from one another. It seems to me that both the LogicEditor's rewrite AND your rewrite both convey that point quite clearly and do indeed lead to the solution quite nicely.

7/29/2017 11:41:06 AM
Topic:
Original Logic Problems August 2017

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 263
LogicEditor wrote:
Thanks for your feedback. I am wondering how we could rephrase that to make it clearer. "The three lectures on each day followed the same theme, but each day's theme was different" probably would do the trick. We're sorry for the confusion this poor wording caused.

Dear Editor and braggin: Without the whole introduction, I can't tell whether this rewrite would really do the trick or is still tricky. It's easy to think a statement is clear when you already know the meaning. Maybe something like this: "On each day, all three lectures had the same theme: X, Y, or Z. No theme was repeated on another day." But, again, the context is needed. How easily one part will be understood may depend on what information was presented already.

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