Solver's Forum
Messages in this topic - RSS

Home » Math and Logic Problem Exchange » "Classic" Puzzles

Logic Problem fans, discuss solutions and get solving help.
11/14/2014 11:33:16 AM

Michael1973
Michael1973
Posts: 58
Some issues describe their content as "classic" logic puzzles, which I've always assumed were repeats from previous issues. I'm curious as to how old these puzzles typically are. I ask because I began doing the Dell logic puzzles sometime around 2008, and I'm seeing puzzles in issues from 2013 that look very familiar. It seems like they'd want to reach back further if they were going to repeat puzzles, no?

11/15/2014 4:59:42 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
I had a subscription to Dell logic puzzles from 2001 to around April or June 2014, and I've often found puzzles repeated every 5 years or so. Sometimes, for example, if there were 5 puzzles I liked from (making up example from thin air here) December, 2003, I might find those same 5 puzzles repeated in (for example) February, 2009. Some puzzles repeat every 3 years, some every 5 years, and some of my favorites are "Knights and Ladies Fair" which is a 9x6 puzzle (I forget if there was an official grid or if I made my own for it) that was near the back of the very first book I tackled, and I've always loved that "difficult" puzzle even though I couldn't solve some of the "easier" ones. There are also some fun puzzles about people who live on the north, and south, side of a street and have different trees at their house, but I forget the name of the puzzle. When one like this repeated, I recognized it and knew I'd enjoy it again. And one favorite that I've written about before, is the pasta restaurant that has 4 sauces, 4 pastas, and 16 people who go to enjoy the food with all different combinations (I think it's 8 married couples but you don't know who's married to whom). I forget the name of that puzzle, but when it repeated about a year ago, I was overjoyed and had fun doing that puzzle again.

I can see why they'd want to repeat some nifty puzzles. At least they don't repeat something the year after they originally had it. Even though they seem familiar, do you like doing them again anyway, Michael?
edited by Amy-in-PA on 11/15/2014

--
Amy

11/17/2014 2:52:42 PM

Michael1973
Michael1973
Posts: 58
I don't mind doing a puzzle again if many years have passed since I did it previously. It's the same with watching movies -- after enough years go by, I tend to only remember just enough of the plot to know I liked it, but most of what happens is a surprise all over again!

I remember the pasta restaurant puzzle. I know I've done it at least once. And just this weekend I did one about the north and south side of the street, but it didn't involve trees. It was about five men making gifts out of wood.

Isn't it funny when you work your way through a higher-level puzzle without much trouble, but then struggle with a two-star puzzle?

11/22/2014 10:35:41 PM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Amy Lowenstein wrote:
I can see why they'd want to repeat some nifty puzzles.
It saves them money whether the puzzle is super nifty or barely acceptable. The constructor is paid just once. The expense of receiving, checking, editing, and proofreading the puzzle doesn't repeat after the first use. Illustrations needn't be redrawn. Perhaps typesetting is saved, too.

11/18/2015 10:13:46 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
I wonder what the editors do on a 2nd printing of a puzzle, when a reader has pointed out a mistake on the first printing after it's been published. I hope they correct the error for the 2nd printing, but, who knows?

--
Amy

12/5/2015 5:40:03 PM

Josh
Josh
Posts: 170
Semipro wrote:
Amy Lowenstein wrote:
I can see why they'd want to repeat some nifty puzzles.
It saves them money whether the puzzle is super nifty or barely acceptable. The constructor is paid just once. The expense of receiving, checking, editing, and proofreading the puzzle doesn't repeat after the first use. Illustrations needn't be redrawn. Perhaps typesetting is saved, too.



As someone who worked in print production and design for awhile, I'm curious about the typesetting part myself. They do update the magazines now and then, revising grids, fonts and so forth, but since the advent of modern production software, where you can convert old files to the latest versions and keep right on going, I wonder if that's helped them out a lot. During my college years at the student newspaper, for instance, I led a series of software conversions that maintained backwards compatibility with the old issues, and we built a pretty helpful library of templates and tools to speed up production of the paper. I can only imagine what Dell and Penny Press can achieve, given puzzles almost always have the same directions each time, etc.

That said, sometimes it's much simpler. The gigantic Penny Press volumes (Family Favorites and whatnot) seem to just be pages fully lifted from a previous issue, with the answer page number whited out and replaced. So it might be even more quick and dirty than what I said!

12/21/2015 6:03:28 PM

wa4lrm
wa4lrm
Posts: 54
I remember several years ago, the last challenger Figure Logic as last one Dell Math & Logic Problems had when one unit equal to other unit and another units would equal another unit like one bag contains so may nails and one carton contains so many bag of nail. I sure would like to see this come back on last challenger Figure Logic. I used to do this on Excel. Will this ever come back?

Home » Math and Logic Problem Exchange » "Classic" Puzzles





7.2.12.0