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4/3/2015 1:58:30 AM

Anna Booth
Anna Booth
Posts: 88
Any tips on Word Math or Arithmetic puzzles? I've read the resources here, but it's just not enough. Can guys help me out?

4/4/2015 12:23:03 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
Hi, Anna. Nice to see another post of yours. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to get started on those Word Math puzzles, and I don't do them, so I can't give you any tips. I suppose the numbers represented by the letters, might be between 0 and 9, and no 2-digit number would be represented by a letter. Other than that, I'm clueless. Anyone else have any ideas?

Happy Easter, everyone.

--
Amy

4/4/2015 12:52:05 PM

Purple Pisces
Purple Pisces
Posts: 878
Hi Anna! I haven't done these in a while so I'm quite a bit rusty at them, but one tip I do have is to start with the left hand side of the puzzle. It will help give a sense if a number was borrowed from another. Also if you see A-A=P, P will probably equal 0, but not always, depending on if a number was borrowed. Also something such as L-G=G, might mean that L is 2 x's G (L=8 and G=4 for example) but again it might not be the case if borrowing from another number takes place. These are usually the things I look for. As with other logic puzzles, a lot of it will just take some practice and developing your own techniques. Hope I helped a little! smile
edited by Purple Pisces on 4/4/2015

4/4/2015 2:44:30 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 697
Hi Anna. Also, when guessing at possibilities, pay attention to what might spell out. For example, no word will start "PD . . ." (0,1) or end ". . . MV" (8,9). I often make a little chart in the empty areas. Such as, if N=4, then here's what P will be, and here's what A will have to be. Then, what if N=3 or 9, what would P and A be? etc. You can sometimes eliminate possibilites this way.

4/5/2015 7:19:03 PM

Josh
Josh
Posts: 170
If the word on the left is repeated as a set of letters being subtracted, you know that it's a 1 at the top for that section. If you have a letter minus a letter equalling a blank space, you know that the letter above it is one more than the letter below it (ex: 3-2=0, because of borrowing). Using that to find letter combos to begin sorting them out, I use that to try to help the anagramming portion of it, once I have what I can confirm in place. I find math can get you mostly there on the easier puzzles, but many times I find myself leaning on the anagram side for harder ones.

4/15/2015 3:09:57 AM

Anna Booth
Anna Booth
Posts: 88
Frances wrote:
Hi Anna. Also, when guessing at possibilities, pay attention to what might spell out. For example, no word will start "PD . . ." (0,1) or end ". . . MV" (8,9). I often make a little chart in the empty areas. Such as, if N=4, then here's what P will be, and here's what A will have to be. Then, what if N=3 or 9, what would P and A be? etc. You can sometimes eliminate possibilites this way.


This one confused me - the one I'm thinking of is letters and you have to convert the letters to numbers...no words are made. Did I call it the wrong thing?

Okay, now I see, pulled the following link (which just hasn't offered me enough up until now)...

****=http://www.pennydellpuzzles.com/upload/documents/How%20to%20Solve%20Word%20Math.pdf]http://www.pennydellpuzzles.com/upload/documents/How%20to%20Solve%20Word%20Math.pdf

So, the words aren't part of the division problem...but the 0-9 spells out a word...is that true??
edited by acbooth8 on 4/15/2015

4/15/2015 3:16:47 AM

Anna Booth
Anna Booth
Posts: 88
Purple Pisces wrote:
Hi Anna! I haven't done these in a while so I'm quite a bit rusty at them, but one tip I do have is to start with the left hand side of the puzzle. It will help give a sense if a number was borrowed from another. Also if you see A-A=P, P will probably equal 0, but not always, depending on if a number was borrowed. Also something such as L-G=G, might mean that L is 2 x's G (L=8 and G=4 for example) but again it might not be the case if borrowing from another number takes place. These are usually the things I look for. As with other logic puzzles, a lot of it will just take some practice and developing your own techniques. Hope I helped a little! smile
edited by Purple Pisces on 4/4/2015


I appreciate this - I understand both of the concepts you mentioned (the two different items that may be a clear start). I would assume if I have an easy level book, this might work. I do appreciate you mentioning the carrying, though...because that could really throw a wrench in things. With one of the long division ones (BTW I've tried very basic ones and struggled...never got back to them LOL)...but those could have carrying anywhere in the section below your top answer.

Good things to think for! I love logic puzzles and am pretty good with them...so maybe I'll be that way with Word Math...I just have to give it a fair try and work my way through it. I've traditionally done the grid logic puzzles...did one the other day with a table - where you get little pieces here and there and I was filling in options all over the place. I was actually able to solve it - I was so proud! There were like 6 or 7 things you had to match up for at least 5 or 6 rows...it was no easy task...but I got it! It all comes down to logical thinking....that's why we puzzle...right? Keep our noggins sharp!

I love all puzzles...I just am aiming to be able to complete any variety puzzle and I've struggled with these to the point I barely try them :/

4/15/2015 3:18:55 AM

Anna Booth
Anna Booth
Posts: 88
jjofriends wrote:
If the word on the left is repeated as a set of letters being subtracted, you know that it's a 1 at the top for that section. If you have a letter minus a letter equalling a blank space, you know that the letter above it is one more than the letter below it (ex: 3-2=0, because of borrowing). Using that to find letter combos to begin sorting them out, I use that to try to help the anagramming portion of it, once I have what I can confirm in place. I find math can get you mostly there on the easier puzzles, but many times I find myself leaning on the anagram side for harder ones.


I find myself using anagram type options for other puzzles (crypto quizzes for example...sometimes I can solve the puzzle - but might not be able to decrypt one of the clues). You're the second person to mention this - I'll have to remember to use a combo of math and anagramming.

I didn't realize until I read this thread that 0-9 made a word! That definitely helps!

4/15/2015 3:22:55 AM

Anna Booth
Anna Booth
Posts: 88
Amy Lowenstein wrote:
Hi, Anna. Nice to see another post of yours. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to get started on those Word Math puzzles, and I don't do them, so I can't give you any tips. I suppose the numbers represented by the letters, might be between 0 and 9, and no 2-digit number would be represented by a letter. Other than that, I'm clueless. Anyone else have any ideas?

Happy Easter, everyone.


Appreciate the response smile Many tips followed...you got it all going!

Hope your holidays were good!

I'm going to be a stay-at-home wife after tomorrow so I can finally get past this 5 year constant pain and get healthy hopefully. Gonna be weaning off medications etc. Hoping things will be better after (I think sometimes the meds make it worse). So, while I will be doing housework, I'm probably gonna have a lot of time where I need something to take my mind off the pain - this is where puzzles come in!

I just hope I don't run out because if I'm not working, won't have much room in the budget.

I actually wanted to stock up on fill-ins with a variety pack but can't bring myself to pay the $8 S&H when I need to be so cost conscious now!

I'll make it work - even if I do the free puzzles...I just hate having to print them...I wish there was an internet platform to do it on here!

4/15/2015 10:08:23 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
You can always print on one page one day, then print on the back of it the next day. At least you save paper that way, even if not ink.

--
Amy

4/15/2015 11:21:20 AM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 697
A reminder: As per the instructions, the 10-letter decoded answer can be a phrase or multiple words, too. It can be challenging for the constructor to keep coming up with answers containing 10 different letters, so some are less than common. Here are a few examples from older puzzles:

young zebra
by virtue of
red ink blot
coal strike
fix those up
doeskin hat
my car is old
gum elastic

4/15/2015 4:26:39 PM

Anna Booth
Anna Booth
Posts: 88
I was just talking to my husband about this - and I'm so happy you said this! I was thinking I could just pick out each letter and anagram it - then see if the math works...haha. But if its weird phrases like this - that might be more difficult!

Frances wrote:
A reminder: As per the instructions, the 10-letter decoded answer can be a phrase or multiple words, too. It can be challenging for the constructor to keep coming up with answers containing 10 different letters, so some are less than common. Here are a few examples from older puzzles:

young zebra
by virtue of
red ink blot
coal strike
fix those up
doeskin hat
my car is old
gum elastic

4/30/2015 3:32:44 PM

Indiana Puzzler
Indiana Puzzler
Posts: 559
Amy Lowenstein wrote:
You can always print on one page one day, then print on the back of it the next day. At least you save paper that way, even if not ink.



Hi all - another trick I do for saving paper is print on the backside (assuming single printed paper) of any "scrap" paper we get in the house - junk mail, paid bills, kids school papers - that way you don't have to use the more expensive purchased papers.

I also grew up with the phrase "scratch paper" for doodling and doing calculations and the such. My kids always ask me what that means. Also, I like to call a TV remote "the clicker" which solicits groans from my 11 and 13 year old daughters.

C

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