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4/18/2017 4:16:51 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 680
Dell's Sunday Crosswords, Spring 2017, page 53, Diagramless One:

Clue 4 Down: ____ of the evening
Answer: Shank

That's a new one for me. My dictionary says this meaning of shank can be the early or latter or main/best part of a period of time.

"It was just the shank of the evening when the party began."
"They didn't get started until the shank of the morning."
"Don't leave yet, it's just the shank of the evening."

Are any of you familiar with this usage?

4/18/2017 9:17:24 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
I had never before heard "shank" used in the way you describe. I know only of a "shank bone," in the leg.

--
Amy

4/19/2017 11:17:18 AM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 274
I've seen it in reading, though not recently. Much of my childhood reading was old books, which my mother bought used. She used to get a box of assorted books at the Salvation Army store for a dollar. That was a long time ago. I won't say just how long, but some of the books were published in the 19th century. It seems to me that I saw "shank" used with "evening" only.

4/21/2017 10:39:47 AM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 235
Hi Frances,

Not only am I familiar with that usage, it's the only definition of the word I've ever known! LOL Maybe it's used more here in the Deep South? I've heard it used many, many times in conversations during my lifetime. smile

Bernadette

5/20/2017 8:28:51 AM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 235
Speaking of unfamiliar usages of words, I was working a Quotagram puzzle yesterday and discovered that "fetish" is another word for "amulet." I've never seen fetish used in any other way than to describe some sort of proclivity for some thing or activity, often of a sexual nature. Live and learn! smile

Bernadette
edited by Bernadette1959 on 5/20/2017

5/25/2017 5:06:10 PM

Indiana Puzzler
Indiana Puzzler
Posts: 558
Hi Bernadette

I want to say I've come across this usage when reading about the southwest Native Americans.

5/25/2017 6:06:15 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 235
Hi Chris!

Thanks for the information! smile

Bernadette

7/23/2017 9:33:52 AM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 235
I just thought I'd add to this thread about certain words and their different usages instead of starting a brand new one.

This morning I was solving an Escalator puzzle in World's Finest Variety Puzzles, Autumn 2017, and came across the clue "precede." Looking at the letters I had to work with, I had a feeling what the answer might turn out to be but still I had never heard the word used in this context before.

The answer turned out to be "forego" and I've never either read or heard this particular usage before. In my experience, "forego" has always meant to give or pass something up. The dictionary does give "precede" as a definition though. Hmm. No wonder I have so much trouble with Escalators! smile
edited by Bernadette1959 on 7/23/2017

7/23/2017 11:33:34 AM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 274
Bernadette, those are two different words. "Forego" means to go before, to precede. "Forgo" means to do without. So many writers misspell one or the other that a reader can easily miss the distinction.

A foregone conclusion is one that was inevitable. It "went before" the actual demonstration or proof that it was true.

7/23/2017 12:25:36 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 680
Bernadette1959 wrote:
I just thought I'd add to this thread about certain words and their different usages instead of starting a brand new one.

This morning I was solving an Escalator puzzle in World's Finest Variety Puzzles, Autumn 2017, and came across the clue "precede." Looking at the letters I had to work with, I had a feeling what the answer might turn out to be but still I had never heard the word used in this context before.

The answer turned out to be "forego" and I've never either read or heard this particular usage before. In my experience, "forego" has always meant to give or pass something up. The dictionary does give "precede" as a definition though. Hmm. No wonder I have so much trouble with Escalators! smile


It seems silly now, but I never connected "foregone conclusion" with "forego" before. The "pass something up" meaning was the only forego/forgo I was familiar with, but I never could remember how to spell it. Now I see the problem was two different words! By the way, just to make it a little more confusing, my dictionary gives "forego" as an alternate spelling for the "forgo" word. ("Forgo" looks weird-----like a proper noun, or maybe an alien in sci-fi! smile )

7/23/2017 12:46:36 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 235
Frances wrote:
It seems silly now, but I never connected "foregone conclusion" with "forego" before. )


Me, either, Frances! When I hear someone say, "a foregone conclusion" I never really think about a conclusion that has "preceded" another one, but rather, more of an assumption about something.

Yes, I agree! "Forgo" definitely has a sci-fi look to it! LOL
edited by Bernadette1959 on 7/23/2017

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