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See what other Variety puzzle fans have to say/share your solutions.
5/25/2017 6:19:53 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 245
I used to solve Word Games puzzles all the time and then it seemed as though the clues in some of them became so esoteric and hard to figure out, that I just quit solving them. So, I've been going through some of my back issues this past week and solving the skipped-over Word Games puzzles. I came across a category that I used to be very familiar with but I've forgotten how it works. Can someone explain it to me again? Here is an example from a puzzle I just finished:

SPOONERISMS

1. Court case examined bard's strings Answer: Saw lute

2. Play roulette and top the sales pitch Answer: Win the spiel

3. Deferral of a franchise debacle Answer: Chain wreck

4. Transmission lever in chiffon present Answer: Sheer gift

I understand part of the clues in relation to the answers, but not the entire sentences. For example, in the first clue I can see where "examined" means "saw" and "bard's strings" means "lute." But how does "court case" come into play? Same problem for the other three clues.

I will certainly appreciate any help understanding this category again! smile

Bernadette


PS. This category is from a Word Games puzzle in Variety Puzzles and Games, March 2017, page 45.





edited by Bernadette1959 on 5/25/2017

5/25/2017 6:54:08 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 698
Bernadette1959 wrote:
I used to solve Word Games puzzles all the time and then it seemed as though the clues in some of them became so esoteric and hard to figure out, that I just quit solving them. So, I've been going through some of my back issues this past week and solving the skipped-over Word Games puzzles. I came across a category that I used to be very familiar with but I've forgotten how it works. Can someone explain it to me again? Here is an example from a puzzle I just finished:

SPOONERISMS

1. Court case examined bard's strings Answer: Saw lute

2. Play roulette and top the sales pitch Answer: Win the spiel

3. Deferral of a franchise debacle Answer: Chain wreck

4. Transmission lever in chiffon present Answer: Sheer gift

I understand part of the clues in relation to the answers, but not the entire sentences. For example, in the first clue I can see where "examined" means "saw" and "bard's strings" means "lute." But how does "court case" come into play? Same problem for the other three clues.

I will certainly appreciate any help understanding this category again! smile

Bernadette


PS. This category is from a Word Games puzzle in Variety Puzzles and Games, March 2017, page 45.





edited by Bernadette1959 on 5/25/2017


Hi Bernadette,

A spoonerism transposes initial letters/sounds of words. So:

1. Law suit/Saw lute
2. Spin the wheel/Win the spiel
3. Rain check/Chain wreck
4. Gear shift/Sheer gift

Frances.

5/25/2017 8:08:09 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 245
Thank you so much, Frances! I appreciate your help!!

5/25/2017 9:08:34 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
I was going to explain about spoonerisms, but then noticed Frances's great explanation. Good luck getting back into Word Games, Bernadette.

--
Amy

5/26/2017 9:35:01 AM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 245
Thanks, Amy!

I had forgotten about the groaners so often used as the answers for these puzzles. Here's the solution for one I finished this morning:

A short fellow from Prague was fleeing the police. He slipped in to a store and asked the cashier, "Could you cache a small Czech?"

Yeesh. LOL! wink
edited by Bernadette1959 on 5/26/2017

5/26/2017 12:29:46 PM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Bernadette, "cache a small Czech" is stolen. I saw it somewhere DECADES ago! Theft is rampant in the humor field because jokes are so hard to invent.

5/26/2017 4:52:20 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
Which reminds me that I guess on Saturday Night Live about 40 years ago or so, Bill Murray and Gilda Radner would often say "That's so funny I forgot to laugh," and an even older joke on Old Time Radio (which I heard in the '80's, originally from the '40's) had Leroy the Great Gildersleeve's nephew telling a joke about "Great day for a race -- the human race" and saying it was an old joke even then. But jokes are always good, no matter how old. Someone's always hearing them for the first time and getting a good laugh out of them.

--
Amy

5/26/2017 7:33:39 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 245
Semipro wrote:
Bernadette, "cache a small Czech" is stolen. I saw it somewhere DECADES ago! Theft is rampant in the humor field because jokes are so hard to invent.


Yes, I think most of the quotes found in PennyDell magazines are probably just taken from books of quotations and after dinner speeches, etc. I guess PD doesn't worry about things like copyright infringement with most of these.
edited by Bernadette1959 on 5/26/2017

5/26/2017 9:39:25 PM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Bernadette1959 wrote:
Yes, I think most of the quotes found in PennyDell magazines are probably just taken from books of quotations and after dinner speeches, etc. I guess PD doesn't worry about things like copyright infringement with most of these.

PP does pay attention to infringement. U.S. copyright law includes exemptions for short passages used for some purposes, such as puzzles and reviews. The amount used as a fraction of the original is one consideration (you can't take much from a short work).

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