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9/16/2017 12:28:03 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 698
I recently did a puzzle which included the word "washcloth". When I was young and heard this word for the first time, I asked my mom what it was, since we didn't seem to have any. She said they meant "washrag", which we always pronounced "WORSHrag". Then I thought "washcloth" sounded like puttin' on airs. smile

9/16/2017 6:13:21 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 245
Then I thought "washcloth" sounded like puttin' on airs.

Frances, my husband has been needling me for almost thirty-five years now about my practice of calling stove burners "eyes." My mother always called them "eyes" so I've always done the same. smile
edited by Bernadette1959 on 9/16/2017

9/16/2017 7:20:34 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 698
I think eyes used that way is mostly in the South. An expression I've used (from my mom) is "I feel like I've been drug through a knothole backwards." I heard that might be Southern. Have you ever heard it used?





edited by Frances on 9/16/2017

9/16/2017 8:25:25 PM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
I use "washcloth" to mean the square of terrycloth that you soap up with to clean yourself in the tub or shower. It comes in the same color and style as a bath towel and hand towel, whatever design is on offer at the moment. An alternative name is "facecloth." A washrag is made of a different fabric and is used to wash dishes or clean household surfaces. It doesn't match anything. I use sponges for dishes and countertops now, but I vaguely recall from childhood that washrags had a coarse, open weave. They may be called dishcloths in the trade (it sounds nicer).

My parents were Midwestern natives who settled in California. The stove had burners. We never called them eyes. We didn't think we were putting on airs.

9/16/2017 8:51:45 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 698
We used a dishrag to wash dishes. A dishcloth dried them. I keep a Dobie pad at the kitchen sink now, and dry with a kitchen towel. But, it's that great invention, the automatic dishwasher, that has taken over most all of the work! smile

9/16/2017 10:13:11 PM

Bernadette1959
Bernadette1959
Posts: 245
Frances wrote:
I think eyes used that way is mostly in the South. An expression I've used (from my mom) is "I feel like I've been drug through a knothole backwards." I heard that might be Southern. Have you ever heard it used?


I've read that expression in novels, but never actually heard anyone use it in conversation before!

By the way, I enjoy knitting cotton dishcloths in lots of different colors and patterns and these are what I use in my kitchen every day. smile
edited by Bernadette1959 on 9/16/2017

9/17/2017 11:22:52 AM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Frances wrote:
We used a dishrag to wash dishes. A dishcloth dried them. I keep a Dobie pad at the kitchen sink now, and dry with a kitchen towel. But, it's that great invention, the automatic dishwasher, that has taken over most all of the work! smile

A dishcloth for drying? I don't know what that kind of dishcloth is, then. When we need to dry dishes, we use a dishtowel, which is probably the same as your kitchen towel. It dries hands, too. But we usually put dishes in the drainer and let them air-dry.

We had the kitchen remodeled in 2015 and chose not to get a dishwasher. This way, there's more room for cabinets and counter space. My husband actually likes washing dishes, so he does most of it.

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