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11/14/2017 9:15:17 AM

Ramsay MacInnes
Ramsay MacInnes
Posts: 16
Logic Art. (A.k.a. Nonograms, Paint By Numbers (Games Magazine), Hanjie (original Asian term), Paint-Doku, Pic-A-Pix, many others). A few puzzles are normally featured in Dell/Penny Logic Problems magazines, but have also been featured in Penny's "Master"/"Tournament" imprint.
Cross-Sums/ Kakoru, Figure Logic, and Diagramless puzzles have specialized "starting helps" such as an outlined number combo, a strategy booster, and 1-across starting box respectively. How about the same for a Logic Art puzzle which seemingly has no apparent definite fill-in area to begin, or in which the numbers are too small or too remote in relation to one another to cohere? Examples could be, "There are 6 blank squares above the 4-block in the rightmost column", or "In the 2 5 3 row near the top, all groups are one or two blank squares apart", or....
I think the possibilities may be endless, and would alleviate much of the frustration of having to peek at an exterior row or column in the answer section (with a cover-up such as an envelope or piece of paper so as not to reveal the whole thing). Since this puzzle's debut like a decade ago, they have become much more refined and less haphazard, also as evidenced by the multitudes of publications dedicated to this type of puzzle (and variants) out there in print and online. This idea could be of further assist.

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Ramsay Mac Innes Rmac1117

11/15/2017 10:42:26 PM

Josh
Josh
Posts: 170
Ramsay MacInnes wrote:
Logic Art. (A.k.a. Nonograms, Paint By Numbers (Games Magazine), Hanjie (original Asian term), Paint-Doku, Pic-A-Pix, many others). A few puzzles are normally featured in Dell/Penny Logic Problems magazines, but have also been featured in Penny's "Master"/"Tournament" imprint.
Cross-Sums/ Kakoru, Figure Logic, and Diagramless puzzles have specialized "starting helps" such as an outlined number combo, a strategy booster, and 1-across starting box respectively. How about the same for a Logic Art puzzle which seemingly has no apparent definite fill-in area to begin, or in which the numbers are too small or too remote in relation to one another to cohere? Examples could be, "There are 6 blank squares above the 4-block in the rightmost column", or "In the 2 5 3 row near the top, all groups are one or two blank squares apart", or....
I think the possibilities may be endless, and would alleviate much of the frustration of having to peek at an exterior row or column in the answer section (with a cover-up such as an envelope or piece of paper so as not to reveal the whole thing). Since this puzzle's debut like a decade ago, they have become much more refined and less haphazard, also as evidenced by the multitudes of publications dedicated to this type of puzzle (and variants) out there in print and online. This idea could be of further assist.



Hi there again! In the case of Logic Art, there's always some rows you can start. You're looking for rows that have one number that equals more than half the row (say a 25 wide grid with a number of 15 - no matter where you place it, the middle 5 squares must be shaded) or combos of numbers that take up a good portion. Using that same 25 example, let's say you have 3 9 4 2. The 3 at the left takes up four spaces (including the minimum one square space you must leave at the left). The 4 and 2, adding 2 spaces, total 8. 3+8=11. That leaves 14 spaces for the 9 to take up. 9 is more than half of 14, which means there will be a couple of squares that will have to be shaded regardless because the 9 will land in that no matter what. (In this case it would be spaces 9-12 of the 25 squares.) Eventually what you shade in a row or column will impact what is crossing it. If you have a row starting with 4 shaded squares, and the fifth square is shaded, the first square can't have anything or else it would be five squares long. And so on. Hope this makes sense!

11/16/2017 11:14:51 AM

Ramsay MacInnes
Ramsay MacInnes
Posts: 16
Hello once again Josh==Thanx for a few more intricate, "subtle" examples (such as 3 9 4 2). Been doing these for a few years now, in PP/D mags, also Games, and several specialized & serialized ppb's I've found on Amazon, some better than others. Was even able to formulate a few "pointers" of my own==I'll share one on the Forum:
Suppose your total length is 25, and you have something such as 6 8 2 5. Adding those, get 21, plus one apiece for a blankie between each of the 4 groups; 3 more for total of 24 here. One less than the total of 25. You can still partially situate most of the blocks, though you can't anchor them (yet). Count off ONE GREATER in each group, here 7, 9, 3, 6. This adds to 25, the original length. Count off sections of 7, 9, 3, and 6 in order (I use "leger" lines to track them), then leave one blank at either end of each section, and fill those in between. (The 8-block would be 7 filled between its two blank "side-anchors" at each end, for instance). DON'T anchor them in (with dots, as I use) as complete yet; subsequent solving would uncover the "extra" blank in the row or column.

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Ramsay Mac Innes Rmac1117

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