Solver's Forum
Messages in this topic - RSS

Home » Word Seek Corner » Zen and the art of the Word Seek

Solvers helping solvers.
2/22/2012 12:28:50 PM

Indiana Puzzler
Indiana Puzzler
Posts: 559
I have had many puzzle snobs look down on word seeks as a non-thinking puzzle, but I find these puzzles are very relaxing and can attain an almost zen state while doing them. I did word seeks while my grandmother solved the NY Time cross word (in pen!) when I was a kid back in the '80s. I love doing these puzzles with my kids and find them totaly relaxing, akin to sorting patterns out of what appears to be random. I thought I would give some love to the Word Seek. A favorite recent theme was "Books of the Bible." I got a couple of the Wheel of Fortune books and my kids (who love Wheel) beat me to solving all the puzzles.

2/22/2012 1:14:49 PM

Purple Pisces
Purple Pisces
Posts: 878
Word Seeks may not be as difficult as some other puzzles but that doesn't make them any less of a puzzle! Plus there are a few varieties of them, such as missing vowels, that increases the thinking level a little more.

2/22/2012 1:48:51 PM

creamchz3@aol.com
creamchz3@aol.com
Posts: 947
My Grandfather, who made three million dollars during the depression and was a member of mensa absolutely loved these puzzles. He was doing them in the nursing home til the day he died. Many people love these or there wouldn't be so many different books of them in the stores. CC

2/24/2012 2:57:22 AM


Guest
I'll tell you this. There are some seeks that really intrigue me. I can't just buy a book of them and be all yippie about it. What I want is a different payoff other than the easter egg hunt where you know how many eggs there are and have the board to find them.

So, my point is if there is a difference in how these are played beyond straight up, I tend to like them better. My faves of them are the missing vowels. For some reason, those are cool to me. On a hair's breadth par with those are the ones with a topic and a list with the first letter only and you find the words. The same with those that have 26 words that involve a letter of the alphabet for each one and you need to find the words.

I also enjoy the puzzles with 2 different grids and you need to find for yourself the words that are ONLY in both, usually about 10 to 16 words, I think. The toughest I've found in this genre are the ones that you don't have the words and all the answers are in triangles and you need to find some 20+ words.

When they don't challenge me more than the zen simplicity of the more simple word seek, I lose interest. Toss in a 'mystery' or one of the versions above I mentioned, and I'm loving it.
<em>edited by TheDarkHorseOne on 2/24/2012</em>

2/24/2012 3:03:58 AM


Guest
Off topic, but in the same vein as my post above, I get sick of the generic frameworks. I really like the missing letters ones, but unless I'm pressed for entertainment, I skip them with that exception, and those that might end up with a phrase, or spell something on the outer edge as they do. Those two, only really as last resort puzzles.

8/25/2012 3:52:53 AM

gatton
gatton
Posts: 15
Until recently I hadn't done a word seek since I was a kid. My grandmother loved them and worked many books of them. She used to give me the "funny pages" from the newspaper. I loved the word seek and the one where you had to find the differences in the two pictures.

Home » Word Seek Corner » Zen and the art of the Word Seek





7.2.12.0