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7/28/2012 12:17:26 AM

Smalls aka Erin
Smalls aka Erin
Posts: 22
This is the top puzzle on page 13. I'm ashamed I'm stuck on this one because it is a two star (supposedly easy) puzzle! As long as I've been doing these off and on, I should be ashamed, haha. Anyway, here it is. Sorry . . . I cannot make graphs, but it does have a graph. I don't want the answers, just to see if someone else can get it. I am apparently missing something, but I've been over and over and over it. Thanks in advance! smile smalls

Logic Problem:

PLAYING THE CLASSICS
Just last week, Melody Music Studios released a CD featuring four classical pieces performed by up-and-coming musicians. Each musician plays a different instrument and recorded a piece by a different classical composer (including Vivaldi) for the compilation. From the following clues, can you determine the order in which each usician's song appears on the recording, the instrument he or she plays, and the composer whose work he or she performs?

Order:
First
Second
Third
Fourth


Musicians:
Fiona
Hugo
Katerina
Ted


Instruments:
Flute
Oboe
Piano
Violin


Composer:
Brahms
Haydn
Mozart
Vivaldi


CLUES:

1. The oboe player's song immediately precedes Hugo's song, which comes at some point before the rendition of the piece composed by Brahms.

2. The recording of the work composed by Haydn plays immediately before the one performed on a violin, which plays at some point before the piece Katerina performed.

3. The song interpreted by the flute player comes immediately after Ted's song.

4. Three songs are the one that features the piano, the one performed by Fiona, and the third one on the CD; neither the third song nor the one performed by Fiona was composed by Mozart.

GOOD LUCK!!

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Smalls smile

7/28/2012 9:16:01 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
I, too, worked on this one. I agree with you that not all the so-called easy puzzles are so easy.

Above the first 3 clues, I made notations for myself as follow:

1 Oboe, Hugo ... Brahms
2 Haydn, Violin .. Katerina
3 Ted, Flute

Then based on the obvious knowledge that the flute can't be the violin, I knew that Ted didn't play a Haydn piece (since Haydn comes right before the violin in clue 2, but Ted comes right before the flute in clue 3).

Also, I knew that the oboe had to be either 1st or 2nd. I also knew that the Haydn piece had to be either 1st or 2nd.
Similarly, Hugo had to be either 2nd or 3rd, and the violin piece had to be either 2nd or 3rd.

I finally had a series of 2-way guesses, so I xeroxed the page and then tried out different scenarios in different colors of ink. The first scenario bombed out, but the 2nd one worked.

Hope this helps get you on your way with this not-really-so-easy-after-all puzzle.

By the way, some of the so-called easy puzzles don't have any grid, and when there's no grid, I often get completely stuck, so I make my own grid and then I can solve the puzzle.

Don't feel bad if you, I, and the editors have a differing perspective on what's easy! Some of their 3-star and 4-star puzzles are easier for me than some of their 2-star puzzles.

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Amy

7/28/2012 4:15:13 PM

Purple Pisces
Purple Pisces
Posts: 878
I was curious so I tried the puzzle as well! Another puzzle where you have to make a guess and see where it leads. I agree with Amy, there have been some 3 or 4 star puzzles that have been easier than a two star. I guess it makes it that much more interesting. You can't exactly be positive what you're in for! smile

7/28/2012 9:23:41 PM

Smalls aka Erin
Smalls aka Erin
Posts: 22
Thanks y'all. I'll keep trying it and use the tips y'all gave. Glad I'm not the only one who thought it was a little bit challenging. smile

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Smalls smile

7/30/2012 9:22:50 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
Update on this puzzle: I finally got around to looking in the back of the book, and I saw I had gotten it wrong after all. What I thought was a working answer, actually violated one of the clues, and in my haste I hadn't realized it. Once I took part of the back-of-the-book answer as a hint, and filled it in, I was able to work out the rest of the puzzle.

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Amy

7/30/2012 1:17:49 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 698
Hi Smalls,
I also tried this logic problem and didn't find a regular grid very helpful. Instead I made small charts, 3 across (columns labeled at top name, composer, instrument) by 4 down (rows labeled at left 1,2,3,4). Using the 3 possibilities of clue 1, where oboe, Hugo, Brahms are, respectively, 1,2,3; 1,2,4; or 2,3,4; the 3 possibilities of clue 2, where Haydn, violin, Katerina are also 1,2,3; 1,2,4; or 2,3,4; and the 3 possibilities of clue 3, where Ted, flute are 1,2; 2,3; or 3,4, I worked these variables into several scenarios. Then, fitting in the information from clue 4, found only one scenario worked.

This is one way I might handle a logic when the grid is only partially filled in from all the clues, and I don't know how to proceed.

Frances.

7/30/2012 9:22:27 PM

Smalls aka Erin
Smalls aka Erin
Posts: 22
Good idea, Frances. I may try that sometime if I can figure out how. I get confused easily when trying to make my own chart or add on. I redid the puzzle and had everything right except I had violin and some other instrument mixed up with the wrong people. I was sick about it as long as I worked on it, ha.

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Smalls smile

7/31/2012 9:55:50 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
Do you have a spreadsheet program like Microsoft Excel, Erin? I use that to make a whole bunch of "generic" grids, and then I often get into one of my generic grids and change the labels so that I get whatever words match the puzzle. I've used formulas to make some of the words I put in at the top, automatically repeat themselves at the left, so that I have to fill in words only once. If you'd like, I can send you a private copy of either the whole shooting match (which goes from something like a 5x4 grid, all the way to about a 12x4 grid) or a few common-size grids (like 6x4, 6x5, 6x6, whatever).

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Amy

7/31/2012 11:56:12 PM

Smalls aka Erin
Smalls aka Erin
Posts: 22
Amy, I do have Excel on my computer but don't know too much about it. It just gives me a huge headache even looking at Excel and all the formulas, etc, ugh. So I would love to have copies of generic grids if possible. That way I'll have extras and can also try some of the ones that don't have the grids or for ones posted here. Thanks lots!!
Erin

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Smalls smile

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