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9/22/2012 11:52:37 AM

nina
nina
Posts: 9
i seriously need the answers to this puzzle HELP
it was made in november 2006

9/22/2012 11:52:56 AM

nina
nina
Posts: 9
nina wrote:
i seriously need the answers to this puzzle HELP
it was made in november 2006

9/22/2012 11:53:11 AM

nina
nina
Posts: 9
it's title is fill in 1

9/22/2012 4:55:06 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
What is the title of the magazine that it was in originally? Isn't there a clue in the back of the magazine? Can you quote the introduction and some clues so people can point you in the right direction?

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Amy

9/23/2012 1:38:31 AM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Amy, most likely Nina doesn't have the back section of the magazine because a copy of the puzzle was handed out as a school assignment.

Fill-Ins don't have introductions and clues like logic problems. They're crosswords with a word list given and a blank diagram.

9/23/2012 11:41:21 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
A blank diagram? Wow, that is tough! If there is a method to solving these, maybe someone could give a hint to Nina about the solving method, but other than that, perhaps she should ask her teacher for a solving hint.

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Amy

9/23/2012 11:38:39 PM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Fill-Ins aren't that tough. The diagram has the black squares in place, so you know the word length for every entry. Let's say the diagram shows that the first word across has six letters and the first word down has four letters. All the six-letter words are listed in one place. All the four-letter words are listed in another place. You look for a pair of 6s and 4s that have the same initial. If there's only one pair like that, those are the words in the upper left corner. If there are more than one pair whose initials match, you have to look at other letters in those words to exclude possibilities until only one possibility if left.

In a given puzzle, the upper left corner may not be the best place to start. It's just the easiest to describe. Sometimes a long word is a good place to start.

As you fill in words in the diagram, cross them off the list.

9/23/2012 11:39:43 PM

Semipro
Semipro
Posts: 292
Proofreading . . .

"until only one possibility IS left."

9/24/2012 8:02:27 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
Thanks for the explanation. Now those puzzles do sound easier to solve than I first thought. And now at least Nina has an idea how to solve the puzzle.

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Amy

9/25/2012 6:49:37 AM

Indiana Puzzler
Indiana Puzzler
Posts: 559
A teacher who assigns Fill-Ins? I missed out on that! Last night my 5th grader daughter brought home a crossword that tied into her social studies assignment on Ferdinand Magellan. It was pretty long (15 clues both across and down) and seemed pretty tough, even with the source material. She solved it without breaking a sweat. I heard her tiptoe into my study last night and asked her what she was doing... next thing I knew she escaped with one of the Variety Puzzle books from my stash!

9/26/2012 2:20:56 AM

creamchz3@aol.com
creamchz3@aol.com
Posts: 947
My boys were never interested but my Grandaughter is always looking over my shoulder and she's only 7. She loves mazes. CC

10/7/2012 3:42:58 PM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1599
Great. Glad to know young people are getting into the Puzzling habit. (By the way, I'm starting to get back from vacation, everybody.)

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Amy





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