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5/13/2013 3:46:34 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 648
And many never make a post. I sure wish more would, too. It doesn't have to be 'important'----nothing's too trivial for my interest when it comes to puzzles! smile

5/13/2013 4:19:02 PM

Purple Pisces
Purple Pisces
Posts: 876
I wish more would participate also. It's always fun talking with fellow puzzlers! smile

5/15/2013 2:25:20 AM

creamchz3@aol.com
creamchz3@aol.com
Posts: 945
Wow Chris I don't consider you new at all. I feel you've been around a long time! By the way they should know that they can really talk about any subject on the Forum II page. Heck for the longest time it was Dark Horse's sports review column! I miss that. CC

5/15/2013 8:45:22 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1569
Right, but at least you could see him and his sports talk on PacerTalk. For those who haven't joined PacerTalk to keep in touch with Dark Horse, that's different.

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Amy

5/16/2013 8:58:15 AM

creamchz3@aol.com
creamchz3@aol.com
Posts: 945
Amy Lowenstein wrote:
Right, but at least you could see him and his sports talk on PacerTalk. For those who haven't joined PacerTalk to keep in touch with Dark Horse, that's different.


AND I DO! CC

12/22/2013 10:53:17 PM

Wagashigrrl
Wagashigrrl
Posts: 19
No better place to post an Intro.
Maybe others will do so as well. I have benefited from the efforts of the posters here, and sharing a little does help the community and camaraderie grow. I know forums typically wax and wane but I hope Dell/PP will be 100 yrs strong in 2021 and continue to be around for a long, long time.

I'm female, married, retired, generally a happy person, currently in California but grew I up in Asia (I love Japan). I have been immersed in the sciences since childhood, and my career was in diagnostic laboratory and research. (but as fun as numbers, quality control and calibrations are, number games are not fun for me). I'm older now, mobility impaired, deaf, a survivor of aortic dissections/multiple thoracic repairs (John Ritter, Lucille Ball, and Albert Einstein all died from aortic dissections.)

My favorite D/PP magazines are the ones with Logic problems. I have actually never have completed any magazine from cover to cover but I never really tire of the grid based logic puzzles.
When I get a variety pack it will usually be Logic, but my most recent was a Variety pack, primarily as stocking stuffer material and--well, a little variety for me.

In other areas, I enjoy computer video games, such as The Sims, The Sims Medieval, some shooters that have a bit of strategy like The Kindoms of Amalur, Assassin's Creed. I also enjoy inexpensive casual games. I build my own PC computers and sometimes get abducted by friends and family to address their computer glitches. I'm no expert but it's fun to keep learning.

I have loved keeping aquariums (cold water & fresh water tropical fish), have shared my life with various critters from cats, pet rats, free range chickens, Arabian horses, dust bunnies and big dogs. My current animal oriented interest is in population genetics to help me teach others how to restore health and improve the genetic diversity of purebred dogs.

Thanks everyone and forum admins, for making this community the helpful puzzle resource that it is.

--
WG
* A child of five could understand this!
Fetch me a child of five. ― Groucho Marx

12/23/2013 10:23:10 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1569
WG: I have been subscribing to Dell's Logic Lovers magazine for over 10 years now. It comes in the mail approximately every 2 months. So in one magazine you get around 80-100 puzzles (they aren't numbered in Dell as they are in Penny, a few of whose old ones I have from when there was a big sale on 28 assorted logic magazines). So I don't know how many logic problems I get with each issue, but I know it's a lot, certainly lots more than the 4 or 5 you get in the variety pack.

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Amy

12/23/2013 7:17:53 PM

Wagashigrrl
Wagashigrrl
Posts: 19
Bernadette1959 wrote:
You mentioned "dissections". Do you mean you've have more than one? May I ask how many surgeries you've had in that area? Thank you. I worry so much about my husband. He is doing fine right now and I am so grateful!
Bernadette, OMG, I'm glad your husband survived this life threatening malady. I don't mind talking about my case briefly here, but we can go into PM so as not to hijack the thread.

Okay, this post is about my story with aortic dissections. Maybe it will help save some other lives. This may be boring to some. But aortic dissections can happen to anyone without warning and athletes and risk takers, people who might have had a car accident and got better, can be at risk.

My first dissection was over twenty years ago. It was not a complete rupture. The descending aorta developed a small tear within the layers of aortic tissue. I typically have low blood pressure, so there wasn't rapid delamination of the tissue. The pain was excruciating; I could barely breathe. The damage was in the back of my upper chest, near the spinal column and that's an area rich with nerves, which explains the pain for this one(the other dissection had NO pain). My husband took me to the ER and after a few hours in triage, they did chest x-ray and EKG, but were unable to diagnose a heart attack. It wasn't. They didn't know what to look for. They kept me overnight on a monitor and IVs, and let me go home late the next day. At home, I was bedridden with pain for a week, it hurt to move... but I recovered enough to get back to work at the lab and in a month or so, I felt "completely well" again.

I found out what had happened a year later. My GP detected a chest murmur at a routine visit (I imagine it as the partially delaminated inner aorta in my upper chest, making raspberries, the lips of a deflating balloon.). He ordered an echocardiogram which revealed the tear in mu descending aorta and then I had to undergo MRI to review the extent of the damage. That's when I learned the interesting term: aortic dissection. It was called a type B which just opens a dead end tunnel; type A is the sort that rips entirely through the aorta and you bleed out, within your body. At this time, the tear was stable and the risk of repairing it was greater than the risk of living with it. So no surgery was done at this time.

Another year passed and that's when I had a dissection of the ascending aorta. It began while I was at work. I was going over some blood smears in the lab, and this is not stressful nor any sort of CV workout... and suddenly I felt really cold, faint and disoriented; there was no pain at all but I had to lay down because I felt I would faint. I had no blood pressure in one arm and the other arm was very low. Once again, my normal low BP probably kept the progress slow. Many hours later I was at the hospital where I told the ER doctor that I believed it was a dissection of my ascending aorta. We both knew it was pretty dire. He told my husband I had 5% chance of surviving. I was transported to a different hospital where they did CTs and MRIs, then put me in surgery.This was a type A, acute dissection. During surgery, after opening my chest, without the chest squeezing it together like a girdle, the aorta exploded. Messy, but they were able to save me without any blood transfusions.

The reason that I go into this at length is because many people who undergo this type of pain or sensation, may only get worked up for a heart attack, and they die later from bleeding internally.

Anyway, seventeen years after the acute dissection, more repairs were done. The first dissection of the descending aorta could not wait repairs any longer; it required three surgeries. The ascending aorta, heart valve, and several carotids in arms and up my neck, were repaired in a surgery that took 18 hours.
In my case it is progressive, so I have to undergo continued monitoring.

That's twenty years. Long story! Bernadette, feel free to PM if you are inclined.

Understand: This is not a problem that defines me, but due to my years of work in medical care, I think it does not hurt to share this information.
One of my married friends in Europe, lost her husband in who had 'ever been sick' all his life, but died in his sleep from an acute dissection.
I have other acquaintances that only realized recently how common this problem may seem to be.

There are many support groups online
http://aorticdissection.com/
http://www.aorticdissection.co.uk/

All the best, stay healthy, happy and in love with friends and family,
edited by Wagashigrrl on 12/23/2013

--
WG
* A child of five could understand this!
Fetch me a child of five. ― Groucho Marx

12/23/2013 7:31:46 PM

Wagashigrrl
Wagashigrrl
Posts: 19
Amy Lowenstein wrote:
WG: I have been subscribing to Dell's Logic Lovers magazine for over 10 years now. It comes in the mail approximately every 2 months. So in one magazine you get around 80-100 puzzles (they aren't numbered in Dell as they are in Penny, a few of whose old ones I have from when there was a big sale on 28 assorted logic magazines). So I don't know how many logic problems I get with each issue, but I know it's a lot, certainly lots more than the 4 or 5 you get in the variety pack.
Thanks for the information, Amy.
I've never subscribed at this point, but I might consider it.
I often bought the puzzles on impulse at the stores, but when I have bought direct from the company, I usually spring for value packs (must be a frugal gene!). I've just mentioned that I have done some serious time in the hospital in the past few years. Having a nice box of Logics to work on (I don't care for hospital TV) kept me entertained and pretty chipper. Nurses had to secure my IVs so that I could use my hands on my puzzles and all the books I brought to read.
edited by Wagashigrrl on 12/23/2013

--
WG
* A child of five could understand this!
Fetch me a child of five. ― Groucho Marx

7/11/2015 8:45:02 PM

Brian Coleman
Brian Coleman
Posts: 15
Hi All... New to forum here. Male in 30s, married with one son. Wife has had a very long run of bad health issues... Lupus, Kidney Failure, Kidney Transplant, Chronic Pain and a host of other complications. Puzzles are a good hobby to keep my mind engaged.

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Puzzle On!

1/25/2016 11:29:08 AM

ChuckUnger
ChuckUnger
Posts: 1
How can I get Codeword Mags or do they make any after the 250 sderries?

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