Solver's Forum
Messages in this topic - RSS

Home » Let Us Know About Possible Mistakes (PP) » What does "ela" mean?

Let Us Know About Possible Mistakes.
12/19/2013 8:57:25 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1576
The "word" of "ela" appears in the daily variety puzzle which is a Codeword, Thursday 12/19. I have no idea what such a "word" means, neither does my dictionary, and when I tried Googling it, I didn't seem to get a definition either, but got lots of acronyms. Normally you don't put proper names into a Codeword, do you? So what is the meaning of "ela" which appears in the answer to the puzzle?

--
Amy

12/19/2013 12:12:48 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 655
The music theorist Guido of Arezzo (or d'Arezzo) was an Italian monk of the eleventh century who is regarded as the inventor of musical notation. His scale of ut[do]-re-mi-fa-so[sol]-la was taken from the first syllables of six short lines of a hymn, "la" being the highest note. The answer "e la" is for puzzle clues such as: High note, Highest note, Guido's note, Old musical note. (Sometimes Notes in Guido's scale is the clue for the answer "elami". Not sure how that one came to be in crossword land.) Perhaps someone else knows the reason why the "la" note is prefaced by "e", Italian for "and", other than just making it usable in our crosswords that generally don't have 2-letter words.

My mother was a fan of codewords, but preferred the magazines of the English version, Cross Reference, that Penny once imported and sold here because (at least at that time) contained less abbreviations, acronyms, two-word phrases, etc. than the Penny puzzles did. Yet she didn't seem to mind contending with British spellings and words!

ETA: On second thought, Guido's ela may not be the reference at all. Maybe an editor will tell us what it is for sure.
edited by Frances on 12/19/2013

12/21/2013 6:48:03 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1576
Thanks for the reference about Guido, Frances. It's a start.

--
Amy

7/26/2015 2:05:14 PM

Tapper
Tapper
Posts: 2
"E la" ("and la") is nice conjecture, but not correct. Guido's original 6-note scale was "ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la" and was later supplemented with "ti" while "ut" was changed to "do" in English. But there were more than 6 notes, so what was Guido's original full scale?

These are medieval hexachords that include Bb3 and Bb4, hence the two consecutive B's in the list. And, here is the full list, from low to high: Gammaut, Are, Bmi, Cfaut, Dsolre, Elami, Ffaut, Gsolreut, Alamire, Bfa, Bmi, Csolfaut, Dlasolre, Elami, Ffaut, Gsolreut, Alamire, Bfa, Bmi, Csolfa, Dlasol, Ela.

The highest note? ....... Ela!

An interesting extra: The lowest note, 'gammaut' is the source for the word gamut, meaning scale, range or spectrum.

(7th should have been Ffaut, not Cfaut - corrected it!)


edited by Tapper on 7/26/2015

7/26/2015 8:03:35 PM

Frances
Frances
Posts: 655
I couldn't make any sense of this at all until I made a chart, pulling apart the syllables from the starting letters (putting the B's in the same row). Then I could see the 6-note scale in a stepladder-like pattern, as I made a new column everytime 'UT' appeared in the series. But, it's really over my head when it comes to understanding it musically. At least I now get where elami comes from: E + LA + MI! Thanks for posting this!

P.S. I think you made a typo on the seventh note.

7/26/2015 10:24:04 PM

Tapper
Tapper
Posts: 2
Guido's scale uses three types of hexachords to cover the entire range. Hexachords on G run from G2 (Gammaut) to E5 (Ela), hexachords on C run from C3 (Cfaut) to A4 (Alamire) and hexachords on F run from F3 (Ffaut) to D5 (Dlasol). Not every note is included in each group and some notes appear in all three. Each group runs, low to high: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la and then repeats; but due to their different starting points, they do not correspond with one another. For example, D4 is sol on the G2-E5 scale, re on the C3-A4 scale and la on the F3-D5 scale. It is therefore known as "Dlasolre". The naming convention is to start with the highest note, 'la' and work downward toward 'ut'.

Modern notes included in each type of hexachord are as follows (Low to High):

Hexachords on G: G2, A2, B2, C3, D3, E3, G3, A3, B3, C4, D4, E4, G4, A4, B4, C5, D5, E5
Hexachords on C: C3, D3, E3, F3, G3, A3, C4, D4, E4, F4, G4, A4
Hexachords on F: F3, G3, A3, Bb3, C4, D4, F4, G4, A4, Bb4, C5, D5

For each line, read ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la and repeat until you reach the end of the line. On the first line, C3 is fa whereas on the second line it is ut. It is called Cfaut. A3 and A4 appear in all three lines, re on the first, la on the second and mi on the third; so we have the euphonious Alamire.

7/29/2015 11:17:21 AM

Indiana Puzzler
Indiana Puzzler
Posts: 557
Tapper wrote:
Guido's scale uses three types of hexachords to cover the entire range. Hexachords on G run from G2 (Gammaut) to E5 (Ela), hexachords on C run from C3 (Cfaut) to A4 (Alamire) and hexachords on F run from F3 (Ffaut) to D5 (Dlasol). Not every note is included in each group and some notes appear in all three. Each group runs, low to high: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la and then repeats; but due to their different starting points, they do not correspond with one another. For example, D4 is sol on the G2-E5 scale, re on the C3-A4 scale and la on the F3-D5 scale. It is therefore known as "Dlasolre". The naming convention is to start with the highest note, 'la' and work downward toward 'ut'.

Modern notes included in each type of hexachord are as follows (Low to High):

Hexachords on G: G2, A2, B2, C3, D3, E3, G3, A3, B3, C4, D4, E4, G4, A4, B4, C5, D5, E5
Hexachords on C: C3, D3, E3, F3, G3, A3, C4, D4, E4, F4, G4, A4
Hexachords on F: F3, G3, A3, Bb3, C4, D4, F4, G4, A4, Bb4, C5, D5

For each line, read ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la and repeat until you reach the end of the line. On the first line, C3 is fa whereas on the second line it is ut. It is called Cfaut. A3 and A4 appear in all three lines, re on the first, la on the second and mi on the third; so we have the euphonious Alamire.


This gets my vote for coolest post on this board!
edited by Chris_INPuzzler on 7/29/2015

12/19/2016 10:12:11 AM

Amy Lowenstein
Amy Lowenstein
Posts: 1576
The same Codeword seems to have appeared today, 3 years later, 12/19/16. I was dumbfounded by "ela" again, and had forgotten all this cool stuff from 3 years ago.

--
Amy

Home » Let Us Know About Possible Mistakes (PP) » What does "ela" mean?





7.2.12.0